Finding Time to Write

Sometimes as writers, we struggle to find time to write. Everyone, unless they’re a retired old fart who doesn’t get out of the house, has a social life and a job and other things that get in the way. The bottom line is, we all have to deal with struggles that come hand in hand with being a writer. One of the biggest struggles, however, is finding the time we need to sit down and write that dang book.

But the dirty little secret is, it’s actually not that hard to do.

If you’re stuck in a rut and you’re having trouble writing whatever project you’re working on, then you need to evaluate what is going on in your life. For years, I’ve been trying to publish a second book, and I’m just now learning to focus onto how to get my words down when I’m struggling. Some of that involves writing detailed outlines, which has nothing to do with finding time to write, but one thing that does relate to it is the idea that you need to schedule your writing time.

Recently, I went to Walmart and bought a weekly planner. That allows me to plan every single day and write down tasks I need to fulfill during the day in question. This means that I can set in stone every day’s tasks and write during my writing time and carry out other tasks that have to be done that day. In the grand scheme of things, it’s taught me how important it is to focus and be consistent. Truth be told, you don’t need a weekly planner if you can learn to focus on when to write without one, but it certainly does help. It’s the best tool I’ve invested in.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

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The Future of Kingslayer

As everyone has probably noticed, I’ve been juggling several ideas for books for awhile now. One thing that I will say is that I’ve been guilty of this thing called “Shiny New Idea Syndrome.” Basically, when I have a brand spanking new idea, I want to see where it takes me.

But nonetheless, I’ve mentioned on Twitter and on here that I’m working on an anthology with stories tied to my novel Kingslayer (the working title being The Kingslayer Anthology), as well as an epistolary novel that centers around the main villain’s first cousin, Vensyr D’Artanian. Both of these projects are things I still want to work on, but it should be noted that with how my brain works and operates, I have to jump from one project to another on a semi-regular basis.

Rest assured, both of these projects will be finished, though it’s unlikely they’ll be out before 2019. But just know that I am a very ambitious writer, which is part of the reason it takes so long; sometimes, I bite off way more than I can chew.

Now to expand on what the future of the “Kingslayer Universe” might look like. I’m done writing typical prose novels in that universe. That is to say, I’ve got two epistolary novels (not just one) that I’d like to see in print. Epistolary, meaning written in the form of letters, journal entries, and other written documents. I did say I was ambitious, didn’t I? To my knowledge, high fantasy and epistolary don’t typically mix. Well, I’ve chosen to try it, but not until I get my anthology out.

So this is what it’s going to look like. As you know, Kingslayer is already out. My next project that I’ll probably release is the anthology; then I’ll release my two epistolary novels (books that cover much of the same events from totally different perspectives) at the exact same time. At least, it’s my goal to do that.

We’ll see if this all turns out the way I hope it will. Just know that once all these books are out, the Kingslayer series will have four very different books.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Description for Non-Characters

In the real world, we see things. It could be anything: cars, houses, trees, the sun, the moon, birds in the sky, or dogs on the ground. For us writers, it is imperative to find a way to describe those things.

This is different than describing characters, since eye color/hair color and slightly less important features cannot be used to describe the thing. For example, a car is not a person. It has a color to its paint job, which is similar to eye/hair color, but it goes far deeper than that. What is the make and model of the car? What kind of tires are on the car? Are there dents on the frame?

You get what I’m saying? The point is, there are a lot of things to point out if you’re going to do your job properly. The most important thing to remember, however, is that there is a such thing as too much description. The car example may work if it’s from the POV of someone who knows about cars, but that same person may not be as savvy on the various sub-genres of fantasy fiction.

A book lover would know those things like the back of their hand, but a car salesman would go in and see books about magic, knights, wizards, and elves, while a book lover knows there’s a lot more to it than that.

In a nutshell, your POV character (or your narrator) will describe things to the reader as they know things. Always keep that in mind.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

World Building

In novel writing, research is key. You have to know what you are writing about before you go about writing the subject in question. But in fantasy and other genres with made up settings, world building takes the place of research, and it is the author’s job to create a world that only exists in the mind.

In order to do that properly, you have to look at things that exist in the real world and ask yourself how that can relate to a fictional one. In the real world, you have cars and other motorized vehicles, but how do people get around in a fantasy world?

Also, if you’re writing fantasy, what does the politics or the religion of people look like? Is your government a monarchy with a democratic twist? Is your religion a polytheistic version of Christianity? Also, what do the world cultures look like? In my novel, Kingslayer, I based a lot of my culture on Europe (not exclusive to England), plus I added a few hundred years so the characters could carry guns and ride airships and trains.

One of my all time favorite examples to world building is Harry Potter. In the magical world, there is a real world equivalent to pretty much everything. For sports, you have Quidditch and the Tri-wizard Tournament; for school, of course, the students focus on the magical arts as opposed to math and grammar, and instead of your ACT’s you have your OWL’s and NEWT’s; and you even have the media with The Daily Prophet.

I haven’t even touched on the Chocolate Frog Cards, so needless to say, HP is chock full of examples of world building. These are just a few ways a writer can make their world truly unique. And in fact, if you are setting your story in a secondary world, there are even more things you can do that are ripe for the picking.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

Brief Update

Before I begin, know that I’ll be posting a blog on some things I’ve learned so far this semester later on today. Now that that’s out of the way, let me update everyone on everything I’ve been working on lately.

No one knows this yet (except perhaps my mother), but I am currently drafting a prologue to better tie up all the plot threads in my first book, Kingslayer. The second thing I’d like to discuss is an anthology of flash fiction that I’m getting ready to write. That seems, as of now, to be the next thing I publish. Each story will be fantasy, in various different sub-genres (starting off with a short space fantasy with a grand idea).

At the moment, a sequel to Kingslayer is not possible. There’s a lot of reasons for this, I think, but the major reason is that I got burnt out from working on the same project for so long. Therefore, I’m moving to shorter fiction for awhile. I need a couple more books under my belt anyway, so short fiction seems to be the way to go. Anyway, that’s it for now.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Changes to Kingslayer, a novel by Napoleon Lovecraft

This is a brief update for my novel Kingslayer. As discussed in past blogs and tweets, I have created bonus content for the readers (a flash fiction narrative and one appendix), to expand more on things that are going on in the text that you don’t see due to the first person narrative.

I have also created a new cover that I think looks more professional. I’ll be republishing the book with new content and a new cover within the week.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Something About Physical Description

It’s time for a confession: I suck as a blogger. I’ve been so stuck in working on a short story that I’ve lost all motivation on working on this blog. However, I hope to change that soon. But for today, I’m going to discuss a subject that every fiction writer needs to know about, and that is how to describe your characters.

Everyone has a unique look about them, so each of your characters should as well. Very rarely will you come into contact with two people who look exactly alike, even identical twins. With twins, one will likely wear their hair differently or not dress the same as the other, so of course it is key to give every single person in your story a unique look.

With my characters, I focus in on eye color and hair color, but there’s a lot more to it than that. Does the character have dimples? Freckles? How tall are they? How much do they weigh? All of these are important questions to ask when deciding how the character looks, but how do you get it across on the page? For me, it all depends on how the writing process goes. Sometimes I’ll imply things, while other times I show it in passing. Sometimes, I’ll dump a brief description and pencil in more info later.

One of my favorite ways of conveying description, however, is to give a character some movement that is somehow important to their physical features. Take the example that follows from my WIP:

“How far is it?” Jocelyn asked, combing her fingers through her curly red hair.

It’s easy to do, and you don’t have to dump the description on the reader. It’s a bit difficult when trying to introduce a lot of main characters at once, but it’s still my favorite of all. The best thing about it is, you can do this with the eyes and other physical features.

I hope this helps.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017