How to Create Your Own Fantasy Creature

In the fantasy genre, we often come across all kinds of magical creatures. Probably the best example in literature that I’m aware of is the Harry Potter books, since there’re hundreds of fantastic beasts in that world. There’s so many of them, in fact, that I can’t name them all.

One thing I can do, however, is say that if you’re writing fantasy, one way to avoid being cliché is to avoid using only the generic fantastical creatures. Today, I’m going to discuss how to create creatures that are truly unique to your world. But before we get into that, we must first understand that there are two types of creatures: sentient and non-sentient.

Sentient creatures are easily more complex than non-sentient creatures. Sentient creatures likely have their own societies or tribes, and because of this, they are in some way going to have their own culture. For instance, Lord of the Rings has different cultures for each of its races. The elves tend to live in the woods and are more deeply tied to magic and things like that, while the dwarves are in their caves digging for gold or other riches. The point is, if you’re creating a fantasy race, you have to give them something that defines them. Also, make sure they have features that are unique from humans. If a humanoid creature has blue hair and red eyes, I’m going to assume they aren’t human.

Non-sentient creatures, on the other hand, are basically your big, bad monster. What you need to consider, however, is what are they most like in the real world? Do they live in the mountains or the water? How are they born? In my novel, I created a creature that is basically a shade-like dragon that is born when a necromancer revives the corpse of a dragon. In a nutshell, it is important to remember how the creature is born and how it behaves in order to fully comprehend everything about your fantasy critter.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2018

Advertisements

Writing for Yourself

Sometimes people act as if writers must automatically want to publish their work, just because that person’s a writer. But to be entirely honest, I didn’t always want to publish my work and get paid for it. It started out as something personal, yet society seems to think writers MUST get published in order to validate their desire to make their art.

I reject the notion that all writers have to publish their work.

The truth is, it’s okay if you want to write just for yourself. In fact, some published writers already write for themselves (myself included), and simply publish the work they happen to put out. The truth is, there is a difference between writing a product and writing for yourself. The best books happen to be stories that the author wrote because that’s the story they wanted to tell. J.K. Rowling wrote Harry Potter because it’s the story she wanted to write, not because she thought it would be a bestseller.

The point I’m trying to make is, write what you want to write, and don’t worry if it gets published. You can always worry about that later. And at the end of the day, if your work doesn’t become a bestseller, at least you enjoyed writing it!

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Finding Time to Write

Sometimes as writers, we struggle to find time to write. Everyone, unless they’re a retired old fart who doesn’t get out of the house, has a social life and a job and other things that get in the way. The bottom line is, we all have to deal with struggles that come hand in hand with being a writer. One of the biggest struggles, however, is finding the time we need to sit down and write that dang book.

But the dirty little secret is, it’s actually not that hard to do.

If you’re stuck in a rut and you’re having trouble writing whatever project you’re working on, then you need to evaluate what is going on in your life. For years, I’ve been trying to publish a second book, and I’m just now learning to focus onto how to get my words down when I’m struggling. Some of that involves writing detailed outlines, which has nothing to do with finding time to write, but one thing that does relate to it is the idea that you need to schedule your writing time.

Recently, I went to Walmart and bought a weekly planner. That allows me to plan every single day and write down tasks I need to fulfill during the day in question. This means that I can set in stone every day’s tasks and write during my writing time and carry out other tasks that have to be done that day. In the grand scheme of things, it’s taught me how important it is to focus and be consistent. Truth be told, you don’t need a weekly planner if you can learn to focus on when to write without one, but it certainly does help. It’s the best tool I’ve invested in.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

The Future of Kingslayer

As everyone has probably noticed, I’ve been juggling several ideas for books for awhile now. One thing that I will say is that I’ve been guilty of this thing called “Shiny New Idea Syndrome.” Basically, when I have a brand spanking new idea, I want to see where it takes me.

But nonetheless, I’ve mentioned on Twitter and on here that I’m working on an anthology with stories tied to my novel Kingslayer (the working title being The Kingslayer Anthology), as well as an epistolary novel that centers around the main villain’s first cousin, Vensyr D’Artanian. Both of these projects are things I still want to work on, but it should be noted that with how my brain works and operates, I have to jump from one project to another on a semi-regular basis.

Rest assured, both of these projects will be finished, though it’s unlikely they’ll be out before 2019. But just know that I am a very ambitious writer, which is part of the reason it takes so long; sometimes, I bite off way more than I can chew.

Now to expand on what the future of the “Kingslayer Universe” might look like. I’m done writing typical prose novels in that universe. That is to say, I’ve got two epistolary novels (not just one) that I’d like to see in print. Epistolary, meaning written in the form of letters, journal entries, and other written documents. I did say I was ambitious, didn’t I? To my knowledge, high fantasy and epistolary don’t typically mix. Well, I’ve chosen to try it, but not until I get my anthology out.

So this is what it’s going to look like. As you know, Kingslayer is already out. My next project that I’ll probably release is the anthology; then I’ll release my two epistolary novels (books that cover much of the same events from totally different perspectives) at the exact same time. At least, it’s my goal to do that.

We’ll see if this all turns out the way I hope it will. Just know that once all these books are out, the Kingslayer series will have four very different books.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Description for Non-Characters

In the real world, we see things. It could be anything: cars, houses, trees, the sun, the moon, birds in the sky, or dogs on the ground. For us writers, it is imperative to find a way to describe those things.

This is different than describing characters, since eye color/hair color and slightly less important features cannot be used to describe the thing. For example, a car is not a person. It has a color to its paint job, which is similar to eye/hair color, but it goes far deeper than that. What is the make and model of the car? What kind of tires are on the car? Are there dents on the frame?

You get what I’m saying? The point is, there are a lot of things to point out if you’re going to do your job properly. The most important thing to remember, however, is that there is a such thing as too much description. The car example may work if it’s from the POV of someone who knows about cars, but that same person may not be as savvy on the various sub-genres of fantasy fiction.

A book lover would know those things like the back of their hand, but a car salesman would go in and see books about magic, knights, wizards, and elves, while a book lover knows there’s a lot more to it than that.

In a nutshell, your POV character (or your narrator) will describe things to the reader as they know things. Always keep that in mind.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

World Building

In novel writing, research is key. You have to know what you are writing about before you go about writing the subject in question. But in fantasy and other genres with made up settings, world building takes the place of research, and it is the author’s job to create a world that only exists in the mind.

In order to do that properly, you have to look at things that exist in the real world and ask yourself how that can relate to a fictional one. In the real world, you have cars and other motorized vehicles, but how do people get around in a fantasy world?

Also, if you’re writing fantasy, what does the politics or the religion of people look like? Is your government a monarchy with a democratic twist? Is your religion a polytheistic version of Christianity? Also, what do the world cultures look like? In my novel, Kingslayer, I based a lot of my culture on Europe (not exclusive to England), plus I added a few hundred years so the characters could carry guns and ride airships and trains.

One of my all time favorite examples to world building is Harry Potter. In the magical world, there is a real world equivalent to pretty much everything. For sports, you have Quidditch and the Tri-wizard Tournament; for school, of course, the students focus on the magical arts as opposed to math and grammar, and instead of your ACT’s you have your OWL’s and NEWT’s; and you even have the media with The Daily Prophet.

I haven’t even touched on the Chocolate Frog Cards, so needless to say, HP is chock full of examples of world building. These are just a few ways a writer can make their world truly unique. And in fact, if you are setting your story in a secondary world, there are even more things you can do that are ripe for the picking.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

Brief Update

Before I begin, know that I’ll be posting a blog on some things I’ve learned so far this semester later on today. Now that that’s out of the way, let me update everyone on everything I’ve been working on lately.

No one knows this yet (except perhaps my mother), but I am currently drafting a prologue to better tie up all the plot threads in my first book, Kingslayer. The second thing I’d like to discuss is an anthology of flash fiction that I’m getting ready to write. That seems, as of now, to be the next thing I publish. Each story will be fantasy, in various different sub-genres (starting off with a short space fantasy with a grand idea).

At the moment, a sequel to Kingslayer is not possible. There’s a lot of reasons for this, I think, but the major reason is that I got burnt out from working on the same project for so long. Therefore, I’m moving to shorter fiction for awhile. I need a couple more books under my belt anyway, so short fiction seems to be the way to go. Anyway, that’s it for now.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017