How to Create Your Own Fantasy Creature

In the fantasy genre, we often come across all kinds of magical creatures. Probably the best example in literature that I’m aware of is the Harry Potter books, since there’re hundreds of fantastic beasts in that world. There’s so many of them, in fact, that I can’t name them all.

One thing I can do, however, is say that if you’re writing fantasy, one way to avoid being cliché is to avoid using only the generic fantastical creatures. Today, I’m going to discuss how to create creatures that are truly unique to your world. But before we get into that, we must first understand that there are two types of creatures: sentient and non-sentient.

Sentient creatures are easily more complex than non-sentient creatures. Sentient creatures likely have their own societies or tribes, and because of this, they are in some way going to have their own culture. For instance, Lord of the Rings has different cultures for each of its races. The elves tend to live in the woods and are more deeply tied to magic and things like that, while the dwarves are in their caves digging for gold or other riches. The point is, if you’re creating a fantasy race, you have to give them something that defines them. Also, make sure they have features that are unique from humans. If a humanoid creature has blue hair and red eyes, I’m going to assume they aren’t human.

Non-sentient creatures, on the other hand, are basically your big, bad monster. What you need to consider, however, is what are they most like in the real world? Do they live in the mountains or the water? How are they born? In my novel, I created a creature that is basically a shade-like dragon that is born when a necromancer revives the corpse of a dragon. In a nutshell, it is important to remember how the creature is born and how it behaves in order to fully comprehend everything about your fantasy critter.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2018



In writing, one of the key elements to making a story great is determining where your story takes place. The location, the culture, and the people in that culture are key when figuring out what happens in your story.

The setting is, in a lot of ways, the most important thing in your story. In a lot of ways, it impacts your characters more than even the plot itself. Without setting, what is to determine how your characters feel about religion and politics? Setting can also define how the characters in question dress. Do they wear cloaks? A turban?

I say all of this because knowing where your story is set is an important thing for you to know even before you write the first word. If you’re setting your story in the real world, it’s key to figure out where. If it’s fantasy, do you have two parallel worlds set in the same place like Harry Potter, or do you have a single world set apart from our own like in Lord of the Rings? In both those cases, some world building is required, but in Harry Potter, some knowledge of the real world is also required.

When it comes to world building, you make everything up from the culture to the religion. But if you incorporate real world settings in the mix, research is mandatory.  The bottom line is that if you want a setting for your world, you need to know everything you can about that setting before you even type the first word.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017