Writing Update, Summer 2018

Hey groupies!

So, I know it’s been awhile and I’m sorry about that. The truth is, I’ve been too busy to keep up a blog, since I’ve been knee deep in a Spanish class that is required for my degree. But more to the point. I’ve been doing a lot of thinking over the last few weeks on where I want to take my writing, and I’ve chosen to start focusing in on short fiction and flash fiction, and maybe a novel here and there.

Obviously, it’s been awhile since I put Kingslayer up on Amazon and other outlets, so I’d say I’m very much behind on getting a second story out to the world. At the moment, I’m working on a short piece that I hope to put into the back of a new edition of my novel, but after that, it’s my goal to get hard at work on two different projects.

The first project is a space fantasy verse novel (yes, you read that correctly), and the second is an anthology of fantasy flash fiction. Given how slow I am as a writer, it will likely be awhile before either of these projects are published. However, I do plan on making some of this work available on my brand new patreon account. It will be awhile before the profile has any posts available, but I’ll make a post about the account when that time comes.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2018

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World Building

In novel writing, research is key. You have to know what you are writing about before you go about writing the subject in question. But in fantasy and other genres with made up settings, world building takes the place of research, and it is the author’s job to create a world that only exists in the mind.

In order to do that properly, you have to look at things that exist in the real world and ask yourself how that can relate to a fictional one. In the real world, you have cars and other motorized vehicles, but how do people get around in a fantasy world?

Also, if you’re writing fantasy, what does the politics or the religion of people look like? Is your government a monarchy with a democratic twist? Is your religion a polytheistic version of Christianity? Also, what do the world cultures look like? In my novel, Kingslayer, I based a lot of my culture on Europe (not exclusive to England), plus I added a few hundred years so the characters could carry guns and ride airships and trains.

One of my all time favorite examples to world building is Harry Potter. In the magical world, there is a real world equivalent to pretty much everything. For sports, you have Quidditch and the Tri-wizard Tournament; for school, of course, the students focus on the magical arts as opposed to math and grammar, and instead of your ACT’s you have your OWL’s and NEWT’s; and you even have the media with The Daily Prophet.

I haven’t even touched on the Chocolate Frog Cards, so needless to say, HP is chock full of examples of world building. These are just a few ways a writer can make their world truly unique. And in fact, if you are setting your story in a secondary world, there are even more things you can do that are ripe for the picking.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

Something I’ve Learned In College

It’s time for a confession. I’m not a fan of creative writing programs in college, unless you’re just looking for a piece of paper to help you make some extra green. The truth is, I haven’t exactly kept any of this a secret while I’ve been using this blog. However, I’ve discovered something useful when it comes to playwriting and screenwriting classes.

They help me outline fiction.

Some may not think this is possible but it is. Currently, I’m taking a playwriting class, and my professor has provided his students with an outline of how the play works and all that jazz. There are three parts to a play (a beginning, middle, and end), and between each part there is some kind of transition between them. This has helped me transition my stories from brief idea that can be summed up on three pages, to a 30-page outline using the beginning-middle-end format for each scene, to a script format to get all the dialogue down with brief description ideas, to a fully-written novel.

I think the evolution between brief idea to full novel speaks for itself. Needless to say, I’m incorporating this into my process, and am attempting to use it to plan a sequel for Kingslayer as well as planning an anthology for shorter fantasy fiction. This plan seems to be working out pretty well so far.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Update: Summer 2017

I know I haven’t been making my regular posts, but I assure you I’m not chillin’ with Tolkien, Poe, Twain, and other dead writers. I have, on the other hand, been very busy. I’ve been taking a senior-level playwriting class, after all. And before that, I was visiting my brother and his girlfriend out in the boonies of Angleton, Texas.

Several projects in a row have fallen apart–including the epistolary novel I spoke about on Twitter–but I did manage to get something else done. I managed to fully draft a piece of flash fiction, which will be published as bonus content in the back of Kingslayer with a simple update to my files (perks of self-publishing). This story actually stems from the failed prequel for my novel that never got finished, but I digress. I’m also going to be publishing an appendix in the back of the book to further explain some of the magical items in my created universe.

Something else I’ve been working on is a new cover for Kingslayer. The current one just isn’t working or getting the book noticed, so I figured a change is in order. It’ll be up soon.

Right now, novels just aren’t working for me. I’m starting to think that short fiction and flash fiction are where I need to focus my attention, until I can readjust my attention to novels again. That’s why I’m considering doing a collection of fantasy flash fiction (some of which will be from the world of Kingslayer, while others will be from entirely new worlds).

All in all, I wanted to update everyone on what I am doing so they can get a bigger picture for why I’ve been absent from the blog scene.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Politics in Fantasy

Every society–whether it be the U.S., Great Britain, North Korea, or a more tribal society like those found in Africa–there is some kind of government that rules over it. There are democracies, republics, dictatorships, monarchies, and even theocracies, but what kind of government you want to put in your world is entirely up to you.

For instance, in my novel Kingslayer there is an evil dictator that is in control; however, 24 years prior to this, there was a government in control that was a hybrid of a democracy and a monarchy (I call it a democratic monarchy). This is something neat that you can do in fantasy. You can take different ideas for governmental systems and mix them to get new types of systems.

You could have a monarchy where the kings are chosen by the church, and therefore have a hybrid of a theocracy and a monarchy, or you can just have the regular types of government and put a new spin on it. There really is no shortage of what you can do when you open your mind up to the fantastical.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

A Review of CreateSpace’s POD Services

As those of you who follow me on Twitter will know, I received a package in the mail on Thursday that contained 4 copies of my novel, Kingslayer. This post will basically be a review of the printing services offered by the company I used, which is CreateSpace. Before I get to that, however, it is important to view the video of me opening the package. Sorry in advance if I seem a little awkward. I’m not much for cameras.

Assuming you’ve gone an watched the video, let’s just cut to the chase. I’m very pleased with the experience. As I said in the video, I’d say it’s 4 1/2 stars out of 5. In other words, I’m 90% pleased, which is pretty good. At first I said that as a bit of a random number, because it’s not going to be perfect; then I realized there was a bit of glue on the backs of a couple of the books.

So in other words, I’m still 90% impressed, only for a different reason. The binding is good, the matte cover is professional looking. Even the Canva cover I made for the book looks flawless. The bottom line is that if they had managed to print the 4 books, I’d give them a full 100% on this. I’m sure they’ll get it right in the future.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

 

Politics in Fantasy

A few days ago, I posted about religion in fantasy, and how to create a fantastical religion. Well, today I’d like to do another world building blog and talk about creating a fantastical political system.

In order to understand how to do this, one must first understand how governments operate. Many of today’s government have three branches: the executive (or king), the legislature, and the courts. Even stories as out there as Star Wars have made up governments built out of these three branches, though the Imperial Senate was abolished in episode IV. That’s not to say you have to do it this way.

It really all depends on what you’re going for. Are you creating a theocracy? If so, do the gods in your world serve as the king, and do earthly priests serve as the legislature (if one even exists)? Are you creating a monarchy? If so, how is it different than the monarchies of Europe?

In order to answer these questions, it is important to research what kind of government you want your world to have. Kingslayer once had a legislature and a court system, but in the novel these things don’t exist anymore (and it’s therefore a dictatorship). Just some things to think about.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017