In writing, one of the key elements to making a story great is determining where your story takes place. The location, the culture, and the people in that culture are key when figuring out what happens in your story.

The setting is, in a lot of ways, the most important thing in your story. In a lot of ways, it impacts your characters more than even the plot itself. Without setting, what is to determine how your characters feel about religion and politics? Setting can also define how the characters in question dress. Do they wear cloaks? A turban?

I say all of this because knowing where your story is set is an important thing for you to know even before you write the first word. If you’re setting your story in the real world, it’s key to figure out where. If it’s fantasy, do you have two parallel worlds set in the same place like Harry Potter, or do you have a single world set apart from our own like in Lord of the Rings? In both those cases, some world building is required, but in Harry Potter, some knowledge of the real world is also required.

When it comes to world building, you make everything up from the culture to the religion. But if you incorporate real world settings in the mix, research is mandatory.  The bottom line is that if you want a setting for your world, you need to know everything you can about that setting before you even type the first word.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017


Description for Non-Characters

In the real world, we see things. It could be anything: cars, houses, trees, the sun, the moon, birds in the sky, or dogs on the ground. For us writers, it is imperative to find a way to describe those things.

This is different than describing characters, since eye color/hair color and slightly less important features cannot be used to describe the thing. For example, a car is not a person. It has a color to its paint job, which is similar to eye/hair color, but it goes far deeper than that. What is the make and model of the car? What kind of tires are on the car? Are there dents on the frame?

You get what I’m saying? The point is, there are a lot of things to point out if you’re going to do your job properly. The most important thing to remember, however, is that there is a such thing as too much description. The car example may work if it’s from the POV of someone who knows about cars, but that same person may not be as savvy on the various sub-genres of fantasy fiction.

A book lover would know those things like the back of their hand, but a car salesman would go in and see books about magic, knights, wizards, and elves, while a book lover knows there’s a lot more to it than that.

In a nutshell, your POV character (or your narrator) will describe things to the reader as they know things. Always keep that in mind.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Something About Physical Description

It’s time for a confession: I suck as a blogger. I’ve been so stuck in working on a short story that I’ve lost all motivation on working on this blog. However, I hope to change that soon. But for today, I’m going to discuss a subject that every fiction writer needs to know about, and that is how to describe your characters.

Everyone has a unique look about them, so each of your characters should as well. Very rarely will you come into contact with two people who look exactly alike, even identical twins. With twins, one will likely wear their hair differently or not dress the same as the other, so of course it is key to give every single person in your story a unique look.

With my characters, I focus in on eye color and hair color, but there’s a lot more to it than that. Does the character have dimples? Freckles? How tall are they? How much do they weigh? All of these are important questions to ask when deciding how the character looks, but how do you get it across on the page? For me, it all depends on how the writing process goes. Sometimes I’ll imply things, while other times I show it in passing. Sometimes, I’ll dump a brief description and pencil in more info later.

One of my favorite ways of conveying description, however, is to give a character some movement that is somehow important to their physical features. Take the example that follows from my WIP:

“How far is it?” Jocelyn asked, combing her fingers through her curly red hair.

It’s easy to do, and you don’t have to dump the description on the reader. It’s a bit difficult when trying to introduce a lot of main characters at once, but it’s still my favorite of all. The best thing about it is, you can do this with the eyes and other physical features.

I hope this helps.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017