A Few Things I Learned From Playwriting and Screenwriting

First of all, I know I said this post would come out yesterday, but life happened. But now that that’s out of the way, I want to discuss some things I’ve learned this semester in my creative writing program, specifically in a pair of playwriting and screenwriting classes. In one of my previous blogs, I said that my CW program hadn’t helped me as a fiction writer, and this was perfectly true, but I’d like to amend that thought and say it was mostly the fiction classes that hadn’t helped. Truth be told, if you want to be a better fiction writer, learning to write scripts is the way to go.

The reason for this is because screenwriting and playwriting dive far deeper into how stories are told. There is terminology at use in both fields (which are basically two sides of the same coin) that help the writer help to structure their character’s motivations. They are called superobjectives. These are basically what the characters are after, and every single character in your novel should have one. The bottom line is, what is their goal? In Star Wars, you can even argue that Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker have opposite superobjectives. Darth Vader wants to turn his son to the Dark Side, while Luke wants to bring his father back to the Light. In a nutshell, what does your character want?

Something else I learned about is the MDQ: the “major dramatic question.” As my professor said, it is the major question (usually asked 10% through the story) that the story depends on to be driven forward. To go back to my Star Wars example, the MDQ could be “Will Luke turn his father from the Dark Side?” It is a question that can be asked in questions beginning in how, what, when where, why, who, and so on. But according to what my prof has said, it is best asked with a “will” question.

The bottom line is that, while fiction writers will not benefit much from a CW program if they’re focused on fiction, there are other types of classes out there that will teach writers the structure of a story in far more detail. That means that classes such as playwriting and screenwriting can actually make you a better writer of fiction, depending on which university you’re going to, of course.

If you like what you see, don’t forget to reblog and follow. See you guys next time.

–N.L., 2017

Author: napoleonlovecraft

Napoleon Lovecraft is a blogger and author from the suburbs of Maumelle, Arkansas. Born in 1988, Lovecraft is a lover of the fantasy genre. It is his goal to write in as many fantasy subgenres before he kicks the bucket, with stories ranging from short stories to full-length novels. His debut novel, Kingslayer, is expected to be a unique take on the High Fantasy genre, having been told in first person and aided with footnotes, not to mention the fact that it is set in a non-medieval fantasy world. Lovecraft is studying for his BA in both Professional Writing and Creative Writing at the University of Central Arkansas. He lives in Greenbrier, Arkansas with his family, where his dog and seven cats keep him in line.

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